September 25, 2019

Assessing the management of Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) revenue [Policy Brief No. 8]

Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC), the national oil company, receives close to one-third of the total petroleum revenues of Ghana, placing it at the core of the country’s aspirations towards effective management of its hydrocarbon resources. This policy brief presents the findings of a study which assessed transparency and efficiency in the management of the petroleum revenue allocated to GNPC.... Read more
September 25, 2019

Assessing the management of Ghana Petroleum Funds [Policy Brief No. 7]

Ghana’s Petroleum Revenue Management Act (PRMA) requires a portion of petroleum revenues to be set aside in the Ghana Petroleum Funds (GPFs) for saving and investment. This policy brief presents the findings of a study which assessed transparency and efficiency in the management of the GPFs. To read the full report, ... Read more
September 25, 2019

Assessing management of the Ghana Petroleum Fund and Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) Revenue [Occasional Paper No. 21]

Since Ghana became a producer and exporter of oil in the late 2010, there has been strong public interest in the management of petroleum revenues accruing to the government, as it is believed that to make the revenues transformative demands their transparent and effective management. This report assess transparency and efficiency in the management of these revenues and offers recommendations... Read more
May 24, 2019

Ghana’s Attempts at Industrialization: How Can the Country Achieve the Success It Yearns For? [Occasional Paper No. 19]

[Occasional Paper No. 19] Ghana’s Attempts at Industrialization: How Can the Country Achieve the Success It Yearns For? Since independence, Ghana has sought to extensively develop the manufacturing sector of the economy with the goal of becoming an industrialized nation, enjoying rapid and sustained economic growth and development. Yet, data reveal that the manufacturing sector has performed very poorly, leading... Read more
January 9, 2019

Enhancing Revenue Mobilization in Ghana through Tax Compliances

Fiscal Alert 16: Enhancing Revenue Mobilization in Ghana through Tax Compliance.

Ghana’s tax/GDP (rebased) ratio currently sits below 13%. Not only is the country’s tax revenue as a share of GDP low in absolute terms, but it is also very low as a share of GDP relative to those of its African peers, pointing to the need to significantly increase tax revenue.

Developing mechanisms to improve tax revenue has, however, become challenging on at least two fronts: (i) lack of good data on tax compliance; and (ii) difficulty in finding effective instruments for improving compliance, given the institutional constraints.

One way to raise more tax revenue, therefore, is to improve the effectiveness of the tax administration system. Another important way is to improve tax compliance. This means strengthening the capacity and resources needed for better taxpayers’ services and enforcement, reviewing tax structures, and investing in skills and management systems needed to establish a productive tax system.

This fiscal alert makes recommendations on how to improve revenue mobilization in Ghana through tax compliance.
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November 19, 2018

The 2018 Fiscal Policy Objectives and Targets: What has changed?

Fiscal Alert 15: The 2018 Fiscal Policy Objectives and Targets: What has changed?

Ghana has been facing fiscal difficulties since 2012 and the effects were at the forefront of the fiscal challenges that confronted the NPP government that came into office in 2017. For most of the past six years, large persistent fiscal deficits and a rising debt burden have posed an increasingly serious policy challenge for the country. The implementation of the single spine salary structure for the public sector in 2010, coupled with a sharp rise in energy-subsidy costs and fiscal transfers, rapidly increased public spending. Consequently, the fiscal deficit rose from 4% of GDP in 2011 to 11.6% in 2012, coupled with a rapid accumulation of government payment arrears. The emergence of a large fiscal deficit and external imbalances led to a slowdown in growth, putting the country’s medium-term prospects at risk. Government’s efforts to achieve fiscal consolidation since mid-2013 were undermined by policy slippages, external shocks, and rising interest cost. As a result, the fiscal deficit remained far elevated and above its target levels, reaching 10.7% of GDP in 2013 and 10.1% in 2014 (World Bank, 2017).
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